KARTU No.2: Cardholder

This is another variation of our cardholder, KARTU. Simpler and is meant to be more playful in terms of contrast and colour. 

We used the well known Chevre Sully from Alran Tannery for the lining. We love the strong and vibrant colour that this leather has, as a matter of fact the cardholder is designed around this material. The outside leather is of an Italian origin, incredibly soft and supple. Unlike most vegetable tanned leather that is of an European origin, the initial colour is relatively pale. It tend to age towards darker brownish instead of the usual yellowish tinge. We will cover more on the leather differences in the upcoming blog. 

The edge has been painted to match the lining colour. We have been working on this technique for quite some times and is really happy with its durability. 

The cardholder is really designed to only carry two cards and some folded cash, just the essential. 

Some pictures...

KARTU: Cardholder

Everybody need cardholder, right? The humble cardholder is a force to be reckon with in today's digital currencies and cashless society. Most if not all leathergoods related brand has at least one version of cardholder and as a testament to human's creativity, each version is incredibly diverse. 

Our version is minimalist in nature, we let the quality of the material do the 'talk', three pockets, somewhat symmetrical with larger opening for the middle pocket. Going against the grain from the mainstream brand, we deliberately made the cardholder somewhat substantial in term of thickness. The thickness also allows us to showcase the edge finish whether it's burnished or painted. 

Some pictures...Let us know your favourite cardholders. 

Front of KARTU with the opening

Front of KARTU with the opening

Front of KARTU

Front of KARTU

Back side of KARTU (good place for stamping initials)

Back side of KARTU (good place for stamping initials)

Shipped with luxurious Linen dust bag

Shipped with luxurious Linen dust bag

Early version of KARTU

Early version of KARTU

TROMSO: A6 Notebook Wallet

It has been a while since we blog about anything! To re-start, we'll be posting our past bespoke project as well as our smaller leathergoods lineup. Tromso is our first foray into this field. Carrying a notebook around does have certain appeal however it needs to be practical at the same time. Combining notebook carrier and a wallet seems to make sense. 

We wanted to design and make something simple to house some sort of notebooks as well as few cards and notes yet small enough to fit in a back pocket and small handbag. Luckily there is plenty of good quality A6 size notebook in the market. We designed Tromso around the A6 size, which is a good compromise between practicality and compactness. Incidentally, Tromso is also a good passport carrier. 

Why the name Tromso? We have had the pleasure of spending some time in that particular city in Norway in the past, it's a city that made us wanted to explore and record the moment, hence the inspiration. 

Some pictures to inspire...

Natural Tromso

Natural Tromso

Burnished edge

Burnished edge

Internal compartment

Internal compartment

Tromso in Black Horween Shell Cordovan

Tromso in Black Horween Shell Cordovan

Tromso in Navy Blue Italian shell Cordovan

Tromso in Navy Blue Italian shell Cordovan

Moleskine Notebooks with our logo stamped

Moleskine Notebooks with our logo stamped

Document Case

This is a request from a colleague of mine and the idea is to create a document case that will fit A4 paper encased in a specific folder. After some research, wet moulding would be the perfect way to achieve this. As this is my first time, I use scrap leather from other projects, the front and the back pieces come from different leather and is rather thick, measuring just under 9mm once completed. 

Wet moulding is quite simple in theory but can get difficult getting the shape right. The idea of wet-moulding is to 're-align' the fiber structure of the leather into the desired shape. The liquid, in this case water, help lubricate the fiber structure within the leather, once the liquid has evaporated, the leather is permanently set into the new shape. This can only be done successfully with vegetable-tanned leather. 

First step is perhaps the most crucial, creating the mold itself. I opted for 25mm thick AB class Plywood, this would need to be sealed to prevent the moisture from the wet leather seeping into the wood grain that can potentially affect the integrity of the wood itself. The mold will need to have smooth edges for the leather to be able to 'flow'. This will then be attached to a bigger rectangular plywood piece for shaping purpose. Picture below

Plywood Mould

Next step is cutting the leather, the plywood base provide a good reference on how big the cut should be. Once cut, it's a matter of getting the leather soaked in water. Remove the leather once air bubble has disappear.

The fun part begin, getting the leather moulded onto the plywood. This require some elbow grease. I utilise smoothed wood block to help smooth and shape the edges. 'V' shape cut is made to allow part of the leather folded into itself. Once the shape is set and solid, I tacked the leather to hold the shape. Some photos:

Moulding the leather with strategically placed 'V' cut

Using smoothed timber block on the edge

Tacking the leather

After this is done, it's just a matter of waiting for the leather to dry, depending on the weather, usually take about 24 hours. Photo:

fully dried

Once dried, the leather can be removed and work on, photo of the completed good:

front of the case

Back of the case

What's on this week

Earlier this week we had the pleasure of attending one of APLF (Asia Pacific Leather Fair) event in Hong Kong. The event was Materials Manufacturing & Technology. 

It was a large event that ran for three days. Many tanneries from various countries attended with their leathers on display. Our goal was to experience first hand what these tanneries has to offer. We were very specific with our requirement which allows us to narrow down handfull of tanneries that can potentially work with us in the future. 

The tanneries that has gained our interest were from Belgium, England, Japan and Italy. 

Masure Tannery from Belgium was outstanding, the leather has excellent temper, very smooth and supple. It also has the best vegetable-tanned smell (in our opinion), smooth and mellow, far from overpowering. *We strongly believe that sense of smell plays a very important role in our life as such that we are always on the lookout for leather that smell 'right'*. We sat down with Thomas to discuss about his leather. He was honest and very knowledgable, outstanding tannery and people skill, thumbs up from us. 

Clayton Leather from England has very interesting leathers on display, not to mention one of the only four tanneries in the world that produces Shell Cordovan leather. We chatted with Ian about his tannery and new product that they are doing at the moment. He also showed us his wallet made from their own Shell leather which was crafted by a Japanese craftsman. An overall nice gentleman with deep knowledge of tannery and leather. 

Next up was Phoenix from Japan, we were initially drawn towards their booth not by their leather but by their embossing equipment, a hefty stainless steel tool with the capability of interchanging embossing logo, a very neat tool albeit expensive one. Turns out they are also a supplier for an excellent Japanese leather. Although they didn't explicitly mention which tannery they sourced their leather from, however based on their sheet we were under the impression that the leather comes from Tochigi Tannery, which is a good thing. The temper of the leather is very similar to that of Masure with more pronounced grain and character, very impressive. The only thing that Masure has the edge is the smell, the Japanese leather has a stronger smell, slightly overpowering in our opinion. Yoshikawa was very helpful and always polite. Despite the language barrier he always manage to help us with our queries. He even remembered us from the day before. Thumbs up. 

Last but not least were tanneries from Italy. We visited Italeather booth and was immediately impressed by their quality and range of leathers. Their natural vegetable-tanned leather may not have the same suppleness as the leather that comes from Masure but their coloured vegetable-tanned is something else. Beautiful colour and rich character combine with aniline dyed is something that I would definitely be happy working with. Whilst admiring the leather we were approached by Sandro, a passionate gentleman. We chatted a fair bit and left the booth with positive impression.   

Overall the expo has been a very positive experience for us, we have gained much needed contacts for high quality vegetable tanned leather. We are strongly considering working with the the above mentioned tanneries to give us more option and creative direction. 

Veikko / Backpack

A new emergence of the backpack trend had set high standards for accessory and leather brands. However we've managed to set our own look and perception to the backpack. As the veg tan leather have a more neutral colour it gives a more classy and chic taste to whatever outfit is being worn. With it's size, it's easy to be able to insert multiple large objects and look comfortably wearing it. 

Kimmi For All Seasons

As the season change so does our closet, but it doesn't have to be a struggle to figure what suits you best each season. Here, we have put together four different looks for four different seasons, including our classic Kimmi bag that goes with every outfit. The Kimmi bag has the form to be the bag on the go and the bag that carries all, with the veg tan look it keeps it classic also giving it a natural pop of colour. 

New website

Welcome to our new website and blogs. If you have followed us previously, this website will be our new blogging platform. 

For our new follower, please feel free to browse our old blog page at www.pedsnro.blogspot.com. 

If you have any questions or queries please feel free to email us on hq@pedsnro.com

Thank you!